JUPITER MEDICAL CENTER PHYSICIANS PRESENT AT AACE 21st ANNUAL SCIENTIFIC CLINICAL CONGRESS

July 10, 2012

JUPITER MEDICAL CENTER PHYSICIANS PRESENT AT AACE
21st ANNUAL SCIENTIFIC CLINICAL CONGRESS

Research Finds Expensive New Technology Fails to Aid Diabetics

JUPITER, Fla. (July 10, 2012) – Physicians affiliated with Jupiter Medical Center recently presented research on “Failure of Short Term iPRO™ CGM to Improve Glycohemoglobin A1c Levels in Clinical Practice” at the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) 21st Annual Scientific and Clinical Congress in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Gary Pepper, MD; Jaime Steinsapir, MD; and Kathryn Reynolds, MD (members of Palm Beach Diabetes and Endocrine Specialists; on staff at Jupiter Medical Center), showed that three days of Continuous Glucose Monitoring (CGM) does not improve blood sugar control in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes in the clinical setting of an office practice.

They studied the results of more than 100 diabetics who wore the iPRO™ CGM (a tiny glucose sensor connected to a recorder worn on the abdomen or upper arm) for three days to see if the procedure improved their blood sugar control in the following months. Measurements of average blood sugar levels were taken prior to, and up to, seven months after the procedure. Despite the effort involved in performing the test, along with a hefty price tag of several hundred dollars, Dr. Pepper’s group found that the iPRO™ monitoring system had no impact on the patient’s blood sugars in the subsequent months. They concluded that the procedure should only be used in very select groups of diabetic patients until better technology is available.

“It is tempting to use new technologies to assist in the management of diabetes, but the complexities involved in regulating glycemic control in a real-life setting appear to require more than is offered by this popular device,” said Dr. Pepper. “We are in agreement with the most recent recommendations by the AACE advising research to pinpoint patient groups which are the best candidates for iPRO™ CGM technology.”

About Jupiter Medical Center
A not-for-profit 283-bed community medical center consisting of 163 private acute care hospital beds and 120 long-term care, sub-acute rehabilitation and Hospice beds, Jupiter Medical Center provides a broad range of services with specialty concentrations in orthopedics and spine, geriatrics, minimally- invasive surgical procedures including robotic surgery, emergency services, cardiac services, obstetrics, cancer care and advanced diagnostics. Founded in 1979, Jupiter Medical Center has approximately 1,500 team members, 520 physicians and 700 volunteers. For more information on Jupiter Medical Center, please call (561) 263-2234 or visit www.jupitermed.com

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